EdFest Part I

I write this post with a wonderfully elated feeling. Although I thought I was prepared for the enormity of the Festival of Education at Wellington College, the vast sprawling avenue of CPD still took me by surprise. At first I feared I would not enjoy the brobdingnagian proportions, however, my current euphoria is evidence that this was a misplaced fear.

Just deciding a schedule for the day was tricky and my best laid plans were immediately changed by the delay to the start of the first session. Nevertheless I managed to see some incredibly high quality speakers; Daisy Christodoulou, Tim Oates, Germaine Greer and Sir Clive Woodward. I also met a very nice man from 9ine. If I am totally honest I made a beeline to him as his stall had water bottles, but his patter rang very true with my experiences and hopes for tech in the classroom. The same goes for Co-ordinate ECA, a new startup that aims to outsource extra-curricular activities to schools. I discussed the importance of all-round education with Jenny, one of the founders. What happens in schools beyond the classroom is incredibly important to me and I hope to hear more of their work tomorrow. I am also very grateful to Stephen of Co-ordinate for buying me a water (you might detect a correlation here; it was incredibly hot and humid when it wasn’t torrential rain and it is very important to keep hydrated!). Bumping into Jill Berry, chatting with Candida Gould and Daniel Sabato, as well as Daniel’s company during yet another biblical downpour, very much put the icing on the cake.

A brief summary of the best sessions I attended:

Daisy Christodolou – discussing issues with APP and looking to explore why it didn’t work. I particularly liked her putting into words one of the fundamental issues, namely that students who needed the feedback most could not access its meaning. It is always a pleasure to listen to Daisy, especially when she is using football-based metaphors: let’s spend more time working on passing drills than playing 11-a-side games!

Tim Oates – deliberated on whether science education has suffered as a result of the reforms to practical work. And in a word “no” it has not. This chimed with my own view, as someone who has taught IGCSE for the last five years, I see no harm in not having a controlled element to practical assessment. And my experience of teaching GCSE for five years before that made me incredibly cynical of so called ISAs, EMPAs and controlled assessment. But it was Tim’s questioning of policy makers wanting students to be “mini-scientists” – do they actually know what being a scientist is like?! – that I most agreed with. Science is full of counter-intuitive ideas that “thinking” like a scientist will never prepare a student for studying it a higher level. This echoes a particular axe I had to grind with the how science works element of GCSE science: students needed to know the ethical considerations for kidney transplantation versus kidney dialysis but did not need to know what the kidney did or its structure. Madness! Tim deserves extra praise for being so incredibly engaging that the impromptu appearance of Will Greenwood (see below) at another session in no way dampened my enthusiasm of listening to him speak.

Sir Clive Woodward is more than anything responsible for my feeling of elation, listening to him in the final slot. WARNING This post is in danger of descending into hero worship. As a schoolboy during his early tenure of England and a university student when we won the World Cup, he really is a living legend in my eyes. Watching Will Greenwood, Jonny Wilkinson, et al is a memory that is becoming more and more rose tinted. If you enjoyed Sir Clive’s Q&A session read Winning! for more insights. He referenced the one hundred one percents by suggesting we “set lots of little standards” which will all add up to make the whole better. He also identified that we have an under-reaction to success; instead of asking what went right we switch off and celebrate. Conversely our over-reaction to failure means we often become stuck in a cycle of disheartening self-evaluation. Woodward finished by suggesting one of the most important attributes is how you bounce-back from failure; specifically referencing Eddie Jones he said “failure strengthens your CV”.

With all of this still fresh in my mind I await tomorrow’s day at the Festival of Education with eager trepidation…

 

 

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3 thoughts on “EdFest Part I

  1. Pingback: EdFest Part II | tlamjs

    1. tlamjs Post author

      Thanks for your comment, Tom. I’m guessing my hopes would be similar to most teachers’ hopes. E.g. tech helps the learning of our students. However, I’m wary that it could become the driver rather than the other way around.

      I’m lucky enough to work with someone who embodies what I think is the correct approach. He uses our current VLE to give students multiple choice questions for homework following set reading. But he has mentioned that it would work better if they did the reading at home and took the MCQs in class. Tech would help him do this, as he’s recognised himself. This is just one example, I wouldn’t want to bore you!

      What are your thoughts?

      Reply

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